Death of The Ford Sedan? Here’s Why Consumers Shouldn’t Panic.

September 21st, 2018 by
2018 ford fiesta drivers auto mart

Photo Credit/Copyright: autoblog.com

In an effort to make the brand more competitive in a fast-changing marketplace, Ford is shedding most of its North American sedan lineup. According to Ford CEO Jim Hackett, this decision was due to a decline in demand and profitability, so Ford will no longer sell the Ford Fiesta Subcompact, the Ford Fusion Midsize, the Ford Taurus, and the Ford CMax Hybrid Compact. Now, before ya’ll go into panic mode, this isn’t an immediate execution.

As a result of the U.S. market dramatically shifting towards trucks and SUVs, according to executives, Ford could also exit or restructure low-performing areas of its business. Ford’s Chief Financial Officer Bob Shanks states that the company has found another $11.5 billion in cost cuts and efficiencies, bringing the total to $25.5 billion in cuts that are expected by 2022. “One-third of Ford’s belt-tightening will come by the end of 2020”, says Shanks.

Yet, as Ford moves away from sedans, can consumers really afford it? We’re in an age where efficiency and practicality are becoming the central motif of modern cars. Additionally, trucks and SUVs are becoming significantly popular, precisely because those vehicles offer consumers more space. However, this is where things could get a little messy. While it’s becoming increasingly clear that Ford is counting on converting more sedan consumers into SUV and truck consumers, what’s to say that this will ultimately prevent them from purchasing a Toyota Camry and/or Corolla, or even a Honda Civic and/or Accord? Think about that.

Focusing on the products that make the most money and are in high consumer demand is a no-brainer. What’s going to happen if gas shoots up to five bucks a gallon again? Ford doesn’t necessarily have small, stable fuel-efficient vehicles anymore. Well, for starters, Ford doesn’t plan on dropping these cars anytime soon, so the terms are subjective. Secondly, Ford promises that hybrid, electric vehicle (EV) crossovers and trucks will have the same fuel economy of those frugal sedans. “We’re starting to crack that code,” promises CEO Jim Hackett.

As previously mentioned, this isn’t an immediate execution. With the exception of the Ford Mustang sports car and the compact, Ford Focus crossover, these changes will progressively happen over the next four years. So don’t panic people! It’s important to also keep in mind that, while these vehicles don’t bring significant profit to the company, there’s nothing wrong with these cars. Each vehicle is affordable, spacious, and refined, so this shouldn’t prevent consumers from stopping by Driver’s Auto Mart and test driving one today!

“I will build a motor car for the great multitude. It will be large enough for the family but small enough for the individual to run and care for. It will be constructed of the best materials, by the best men to be hired, after the simplest designs that modern engineering can devise. But it will be so low in price that no man making a good salary will be unable to own one — and enjoy with his family the blessing of hours of pleasure in God’s great open spaces.”

Henry Ford

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